The war on Christmas

Christmas is a time of year for great hope.  For over two thousand years there has been a war on Christmas, fought by kings and priests and pharisees and emperors and dictators and premiers and all manner of men of authority, in every nation on Earth, since the night of the very first Christmas.  Born of sterile bureaucratic heartlessness that told a poor young mother on the verge of childbirth to travel to a town she had never seen without funds to pay for decent shelter to even give birth in, and greeted by the first of many bloody massacres as the first of many governments realized what this event could mean for them and their power, Christmas survived far graver threats than a red cup or a halfhearted “happy holidays” while still in its very infancy.  The fact that the celebration acquired elements of pagan solstice celebrations is simply evidence of its unstoppable inclusive and assimilative power, its pervasiveness through all civilized cultures proves it has roots far deeper than myth or legend, and its place in modern society even in a commercialized form with Santa Claus and trees and gifts and television specials just shows its versatility and its power to reach deep into the secular world with its message of goodwill, happiness, love, and above all, hope.

Yes, there has always been and will always be a war on Christmas.  Human history is the story of the war on Christmas.  It is a testament to the power of this one pivotal event that with few weapons besides good cheer, persistence, and faith, this simple and beloved holiday has outlasted empires, kingdoms, armies, churches, cults, and every other force ever arrayed against it.  Christmas has been winning the war on Christmas for two millennia running and I see no sign of that changing.  As long as those of us who believe in justice and righteousness in this world remain and have the vision and wisdom to see the star over Bethlehem, there will always be hope.

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